Categories


Recent Posts


Recent Comments


Archives


Meta



It seems to be a common misperception that everyone who gets admitted to inpatient psychiatric facilities is clinically insane. The opposite however, appears to be true. Anyone who is experiencing some form of psychiatric crisis can be admitted. Often times these crises involve things such as self-harm, thoughts about suicide, and suicide attempts.

Contrary to what the general public often seems to think, these facilities do not contain wards of patients in straitjackets and vast arrays of disturbing scenes. Things many of us are familiar with often occur in these places such as group therapy, one-on-one sessions with psychologists and psychiatrists, etc.

While everyone’s experiences in inpatient psychiatric facilities may differ, often times, they at least allow for the opportunity to reflect. Getting put into a new and foreign environment may often cause some immediate anxiety and stress, but by ensuring that you have an attitude that is reflective of a desire to truly get better, you can leave the treatment facility with a fresh outlook.

Sometimes a hospitalization for something such as self-harm can serve as a “wake-up call” for just how serious this action is. A lot of the time, people who self-harm often as a coping mechanism eventually begin to make excuses and justifications for their actions. Overtime, the severity of self-harm seems to diminish and we lose touch with what is “acceptable” and “healthy.” After being admitted, the severity of the behavior returns as we realize that it is the cause of our hospitalization.

While some hospitalizations may feel terrifying and unproductive, like I said before, they can serve as a time to reflect. Sometimes when there is too much going on in our lives, a hospitalization can be a reprieve—a time to get our mental health back in order. If the therapy sessions in this setting do not seem helpful, keep in touch with your outpatient therapist or psychiatrist and be sure that you are practicing the healthy coping mechanisms that you have learned from therapy. I have found that inpatient clinical settings can be a very helpful place to practice many of these positive coping skills as you have less weighing on you mentally from “the outside world.”


Comments

4
  • Blue

    Blue Blue

    Reply Author

    Hospitalization isn’t something you should fake through. I have been hospitalized 4 times this year and I lied through all of them but this recent last hospitalization. They kept putting me back because I was no better than when I was first put in. Now that I told the truth and put in effort, I no longer feel the need to end my life. The hospitals aren’t scary, its more of are you going to help yourself, or are you going to continue your life they way you were before you were hospitalized? Do yourself a favor and dont take it for granted. They’re there to help. So take it. Love, Blue

    Posted on

  • ive lOST my SANITY

    Would it be on a record, of somesort if you were hospitalized? I’ve had people notice my cuts and burns before, but I wasnt taken anywere. My family seen, they didnt seem to care. A few other people seen. Thy neverasked about them. Why wouldnt you be in a psychiatric ward instead? Isnt that better for you?

    Posted on

  • c

    c c

    Reply Author

    Would anyone see it on record (like if I tried to get a job or apply for something?)

    Posted on

    • Ashley Womble

      I wish I could say no, but it depends on what state you live in. Call the Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK and they can help you figure it out based on where you are.

      Posted on